NYFC’s 3rd Annual National Leadership Convergence

In early November, more than 80 young farmers, staff, and speakers from 26 states gathered at Old Town Farm in Albuquerque, New Mexico, for NYFC’s 3rd annual National Leadership Convergence. Farmers from Georgia to Oregon, Minnesota to Arizona came together to sharpen their organizing and advocacy skills, strengthen their networks, and strategize together how to win a farm bill that supports all young farmers.  

Now is a critical moment for young farmers across the country to galvanize their voice as Congress negotiates the next farm bill. The farm bill affects nearly every aspect of food and agriculture in the U.S., from farm financing and beginning farmer education to farmland conservation and nutrition assistance. Convergence leaders returned to their home chapters—now 40 nationwide and growing—with tools for change and a national movement behind them.

Lindsey Lundsford of Tuskeegee, AL, and Eduardo Rivera of Minneapolis, MN.

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Spread the Word: New Report on Young Farmers

 

This is big news, and we need your help sharing it far and wide!

In early 2017, NYFC conducted the second-ever National Young Farmer Survey, collecting data from thousands of young farmers across the U.S. Now we’ve released the report on our findings and present a policy roadmap to help young farmers succeed!

Please read the report, “Building a Future with Farmers II: Results and Recommendations from the National Young Farmer Survey.” Then help us spread the word and keep up the momentum heading into the farm bill!

 

Click to read the report.

 

News from the West


The end of summer brought both bounty and hardship to Western farmers and ranchers. From hurricanes to fire, flood to drought, many have struggled with serious impacts to both their operations and their communities.

But as farmers do, you are rebuilding, pitching in, and standing together. Times like these remind us how important it is to strengthen our communities and build a common voice for resilient agriculture.

NYFC’s Western team has been working with members across the West to do just this. Here’s some of what we’ve been up to recently.

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Ready, set, harvest: fixing equipment & finding markets

By Andrew Barsness

The fate of my crop—and my profit—often comes down to the state of my equipment. As harvest approaches, farmers are busy prepping all of their harvest equipment while they still have an opportunity to do so. During harvest we’re often working hard from before sunup to after sundown, leaving little time to work on broken machinery. Due to the time-sensitive nature of harvest, downtime resulting from equipment breakdowns can be disastrous.

Every grain crop has a moisture content range in which it can be successfully harvested. Grain that’s too moist makes the harvesting process difficult or impossible; grain that’s too dry is also problematic, and reduces both yield and quality. It’s critical to get the crop off of the field and transported to a buyer or a storage facility when it’s in that Goldilocks moisture range. It also needs to be harvested before any inclement weather arrives. Every time a grain crop that’s ready to harvest gets rained on, the grain quality goes down. Multiple wetting and drying cycles can have a devastating impact on quality. (more…)

Run for your FSA County Committee

Through policy advocacy and working with USDA staff at the national level, NYFC has been fighting to make sure that Farm Service Agency (FSA) loans and programs truly serve the needs of all young farmers. There’s also a way for you to get directly involved with the day-to-day operations of FSA and to shape FSA programs at the local level.

This month is the nomination period for FSA County Committees. (more…)

Young Farmers Rely on Affordable Health Care

With the Senate’s repeal of the Affordable Care Act looming, young farmers from across the country are writing to tell us about what’s at stake on their farms. Here are their stories. (more…)

12 farmers, 44 meetings, 1 day

In the first week of June, with the 2018 farm bill already in motion, twelve young farmers flew to D.C. to tell Congress we need a farm bill that invests in our future. They discussed land access, student loans, health care and more. We held 44 meetings in one day and left D.C. feeling confident that young farmer interests will be included in the next farm bill.

June is one of the hardest times of the year to leave the farm, and we’re so grateful to our farmers for taking the time to share their stories. Thanks also to Applegate and the Walton Family Foundation for their generous support to make the fly-in possible. (more…)

Vermont Land Access Innovations Training

Participants in VLT and NYFC’s two-day Land Access Innovations Training in Burlington, VT.

In April, the National Young Farmers Coalition and the Vermont Land Trust teamed up to host a two-day Land Access Innovations Training in Vermont. The training brought together staff from 26 land trusts, state agencies, foundations, and other organizations across 10 states to discuss tools and strategies for protecting working farmland and helping the next generation of farmers access land. (more…)

Why would my small farm need a produce safety training?

In 2011, a law called the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) gave the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the responsibility to regulate how food safety is managed on farms and in facilities that process food. At NYFC, we’re part of an alliance managed by the National Farmers Union called the Local Food Safety Collaborate that aims to give smaller producers who market locally a source for education and training on FSMA. NYFC is planning workshops across the South on the Produce Safety Rule and is writing a guidebook on these food safety regulations. Along the way, we’re talking with farmers to assess what tools, trainings, materials, or guidance will be most helpful for small, young, diversified growers to learn and comply with these new regulations.

We understand that many young farmers, ranchers, and food producers will be “qualified exempt” from this rule, meaning that they won’t have to follow ALL of the parts of the law due to size and marketing strategy.  Here’s a flowchart to help farms understand exemptions from the Produce Safety Rule. Here’s a link to understand Preventive Controls rule exemptions for facilities that manufacture, process, store, or pack food. We also want to be sure that even exempt growers understand the rules, what parts of the rules will still be important, and, ultimately, how to make their produce or food as safe as possible.

You might wonder, “I’m not a big farm, why would I take that workshop?” At NYFC, we think these food safety trainings are worthwhile for ALL farmers. Here are some reasons we think you might want to attend:

  • Your farm might expand. Perhaps you’re exempt now, but might not be as your business grows and evolves. Knowing these food safety rules will allow you to made infrastructure improvements that will comply with the rule as your business grows.
  • Learn how to make your food safer. All farms can be safer and cleaner. Some of these rules are onerous, but some of them seem practical. With a few tweaks, you could implement changes that make your produce safer. These changes could potentially increase the storage life of your crops, as taking steps to decrease bacteria can make it last longer and look better.
  • Exempt from the law, but not the marketplace. You might be qualified exempt from the rule as per the FDA. Yet, your buyers might begin to require compliance. When GAPs were introduced, even some farmers markets began to encourage associated farmers to become GAPs certified. We may see wholesale buyers, restaurants, or insurance companies begin to push otherwise exempt farmers toward compliance of the Produce Safety Rule.
  • Learn in an environment of your peers. Large produce growers are learning this same curriculum, but we hope that the conversation occurring between small, diversified growers will be helpful to beginning farmers. Also, the NYFC workshops are taught by farmers.
  • It’s affordable. We’re heavily subsidizing this workshop so that growers like you can ease into compliance and learn how to make their food safer and businesses stronger. The rules of FDA say that you only have to complete this course once a lifetime, so you could save money by taking it now. 
  • Learn more about the rule. Maybe you’ll be “qualified exempt.” You’ll still need to keep some records to prove the exemption. Additionally, you might be curious about how the rule works and why growers are so worked up. Come and learn the ins-and-outs of the rule so that you can be informed about these regulations that could greatly impact the agricultural community.
  • Give your feedback. We need to understand how and where this rule impacts farms most. NYFC can also advocate to changes in the rule or the curriculum if we know what challenges you find. We can only get that feedback from farmers who have attended the training and understand the rule.

Currently, we’re planning our workshops in the South and Southeast with our chapters in Missouri, Middle Georgia, and the West Virginia/Virginia Tri-State area. We’re hoping to plan many more. Our partners in the Local Food Safety Collaborate have other workshops planned around the country. Contact us if you want to host a food safety workshop or have feedback on this project!

Is Whole Farm Revenue Insurance right for your farm?

Whole Farm Revenue Protection (WFRP) is a new national crop insurance program for farmers. Since it is so new, lots of people are unclear about how it works.

Traditionally, CSA and market farmers didn’t buy crop insurance because the crops they grew weren’t covered, the paperwork was mountainous, or the coverage amounts were based on wholesale or commodity crop pricing. Crop insurance was also viewed as less crucial to those with diversified farms and direct-market sales because they are exposed to less single-crop risk and they can sell their products for higher prices.

In 2003 the USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) implemented a pilot program for diversified farmers called the Adjusted Gross Revenue Program (AGR and AGR-Lite), but participation was low. In recent years, sustainable ag groups, like the National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition, saw this gap and collaborated with RMA to develop a better option. In late 2014, the USDA rolled out a new insurance option, Whole Farm Revenue Protection (WFRP), to reach small and diversified growers. CSA, farmers market, and wholesale producers can be covered under this insurance plan. In fact, it was created with those groups in mind. And it isn’t just for crops— it applies to dairy and meat farmers, too!

Whole Farm Revenue Protection is subsidized to be affordable, and an individual farm’s diversification raises the level of subsidy available. Farmers base their insured revenue on their own previous sales records, so the farmer is able to set the worth of their crop. WFRP is administered by RMA and sold and serviced by private insurance agents. Also, if you’re considering FSA loans, WFRP will meet the FSA insurance requirement.

A team at Cornell has worked to create an online tool that helps farmers compare premiums, levels of coverage, and indemnity payments. In order to buy insurance, you’ll have to speak with a crop insurance agent.

Here at NYFC, we’re trying to help farmers better understand this opportunity and identify if it works for their farm. Are you having a hard time understanding how WFRP works? Are there barriers that keep you from using it? Are small, beginning farmers inherently opposed to crop insurance? Are the premiums or the payouts too confusing? We want to help you understand this option, and figure out if it is a good fit for your farm. Check out this introduction to WFRP and a new online tool developed by Cornell University’s Ag Analytics team to evaluate the program’s usefulness on your farm.

Cornell University Professor Jennifer Ifft invites farmers with questions or feedback about crop insurance to contact her for one-on-one information sessions between now and the March 15th sign-up deadline. Reach her via email at jifft@cornell.edu or phone at (607) 255-4769. She should be available during the following times, or you can call to set up a specific time:

March 6: 2-4pm
March 7: 9am-11am
March 9: 2-4pm
March 11: 9am-11am

If WFRP is a good fit for your farm, there’s still time to sign up for 2017! The final day to sign up for WFRP for the 2017 crop year is March 15th. If it isn’t a good fit, please help us understand what needs to be changed to make it more helpful for beginning farmers. Please contact Cara or write a comment on this post if you have crop insurance feedback.

This article is a part of the activities of the New York Crop Insurance Education and Risk Management Project, which is managed by Cornell University in partnership with the USDA Risk Management Agency to deliver crop insurance education in New York State.